Post 2

You can still make the nav appear in the header of the page (or wherever else you want) using CSS, but when a blind user reads the page with a screen reader, they won’t be affronted with the long list of links until after they’re finished reading the content of the page.You can still make the nav appear in the header of the page (or wherever else you want) using CSS, but when a blind user reads the page with a screen reader, they won’t be affronted with the long list of links until after they’re finished reading the content of the page.You can still make the nav appear in the header of the page (or wherever else you want) using CSS, but when a blind user reads the page with a screen reader, they won’t be affronted with the long list of links until after they’re finished reading the content of the page.You can still make the nav appear in the header of the page (or wherever else you want) using CSS, but when a blind user reads the page with a screen reader, they won’t be affronted with the long list of links until after they’re finished reading the content of the page.You can still make the nav appear in the header of the page (or wherever else you want) using CSS, but when a blind user reads the page with a screen reader, they won’t be affronted with the long list of links until after they’re finished reading the content of the page.You can still make the nav appear in the header of the page (or wherever else you want) using CSS, but when a blind user reads the page with a screen reader, they won’t be affronted with the long list of links until after they’re finished reading the content of the page.You can still make the nav appear in the header of the page (or wherever else you want) using CSS, but when a blind user reads the page with a screen reader, they won’t be affronted with the long list of links until after they’re finished reading the content of the page.You can still make the nav appear in the header of the page (or wherever else you want) using CSS, but when a blind user reads the page with a screen reader, they won’t be affronted with the long list of links until after they’re finished reading the content of the page.You can still make the nav appear in the header of the page (or wherever else you want) using CSS, but when a blind user reads the page with a screen reader, they won’t be affronted with the long list of links until after they’re finished reading the content of the page.